What I Read in July 2017

July was a little bit of a slower month for me, reading-wise. I read six books in the month of July, though I also got partway through a few others that I’m finishing up this week. I’m currently at 66 books for the year, which is 7 books ahead of schedule to reach my goal of 100 books. Still on track, but I need to pick it back up!


Dear Ijeawele got a solid five stars, while I had three novels that ranked as four stars each.

5 stars:

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: I loved every bit of this short book, and highly recommend it to any women, anyone with kids, or really… anyone. So many wonderful points, and told in a very matter-of-fact and sensible way.

4 stars:

Attachments, by Rainbow Rowell: This started off a bit slow and boring, but about a third of the way in it really picked up and I loved it! Cute rom com with a modern twist (even though it’s set in the 90s).

The Assistants, by Camille Perri: Although the main character was incredibly dumb, once you got past the initial fraud, it was a light/fun read – reminiscent of a Lauren Weisberger (The Devil Wears Prada) book. I enjoyed the way the novel progressed, and even grew to like some of the initially annoying characters.

The Bookshop on the Corner, by Jenny Colgan: This was one of my favorite Jenny Colgan books – I really loved seeing Nina transform from shy bookworm to confident business owner. I was also kept guessing throughout as to who she’d end up with. Cute novel!

3 stars:

Sweetshop of Dreams, by Jenny Colgan: I didn’t like these characters quite as much as those in Colgan’s other novels, but they slowly grew on me and by the end I was rooting for Rosie.

The Sound of Gravel, by Ruth Wariner: This book about polygamists in Mexico/Texas was a book club pick… but then I ended up not being able to attend that particular book club. I finally read it, and found it really tough to read because I found myself so frustrated with Ruthie’s parents’ choices. In general, I’m not a fan of the dysfunctional family genre of nonfiction (e.g., The Glass Castle); it makes me uncomfortable to read. But, I also think it’s good to broaden my mindset and understand different experiences, and this certainly did that.

Any book recommendations for me? Follow me here on Goodreads to keep up with what I’m reading in real time.


  1. Have you read Zadie Smith’s Swing Time? I am currently reading it and really enjoying it. Very well written.

    • I haven’t! I put it on my Goodreads list a long time ago but hadn’t gotten to it yet… will move it up in priority now :)

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